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"Combat Position"?

Jed:

“Why is it anti-Greenland if the BCU is set on ‘combat position’? I regularly extend my paddle when the mood strikes, in part because of the classes I took with Derek. But during a Star assessment I always stay in combat position. It doesn't seem like a big deal to me.”
-- http://www.kayakforum.com/cgi-bin/Technique/index.cgi?read=7602

Derek Hutchinson:

“As a matter of course, it was quite natural for the Eskimo hunter to slide his hands along to one end of his paddle, thereby gaining extra length and leverage to help with a variety of strokes and braces which he used as part of his daily work.

The modern paddler will also often find an advantage in the added leverage gained by holding the paddle in what is now known as the extended paddle position. It will help to give you confidence when practicing any of the supporting or bracing strokes, and it is especially useful for such manoeuvres as turning a kayak in high winds. There are a number of Eskimo rolls which require the paddle to be held in the extended position.” --The Complete Book of Sea Kayaking, page 41.

A cursory search at:

http://www.bcu.org.uk/default.asp

did not uncover an explicit reference to “combat position” or an explicit reference against extending the paddle. However, I may have overlooked something. Can anyone clarify the so called “combat position” and how it relates to the BCU? Does the BCU have a strict rule against extending the paddle? Does the BCU require the “combat position” throughout an assessment? Is this discretionary and dependent on the coach? How is it defined and how would it apply to Greenland style paddling? What is the rationalization?

Thanks in advance,
Craig

Messages In This Thread

"Combat Position"?
Re: "Combat Position"?
It isn't the paddle
Re: It isn't the paddle
Anyone have a link to the:
Re: Anyone have a link to the:
Re: additional info
Re: additional info
Re: additional info
Re: It isn't the paddle
. . it's the motion . .
Re: . . it's the motion . .
Re: . . it's the motion . .